Public Lecture: The History of the Poor Clares of Darlington

I was honoured to be asked to give a public lecture by the Friends of Saint Cuthbert’s Church, who have always supported my work and allowed me access to resources at the church without reservation. The talk focused on the history of the Poor Clares of Darlington, focusing especially on the manuscripts which are stored at the University of Durham and had formed the basis of my IMEMS Library Fellowship there. While the talk should…

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Funding Success: EAB Publication Grant

I am delighted to announce that I have been awarded a publication grant from the Elizabeth Ann Bogert Memorial Fund for the Study or Practice of Christian Mysticism to support the publication and illustration costs of my first monograph Mysticism in Early Modern England (due to be published in 2019 with Boydell & Brewer). This is the second time the Bogert Fund has supported my research and publication activities, for which I am incredibly grateful.…

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Conference Report: Early Modern Political Thought and Twenty-First Century Politics, 16th May 2018

Recently I was fortunate enough to attend an evening workshop at the Lit & Phil Library, Newcastle. The goal of the session was to explore what early-modern thinkers had to say on the themes of popular mobilisation, toleration, environmentalism and exile and what their insights might add to contemporary political discussions. The workshop was organised by Dr Rachel Hammersley, Senior Lecturer in Intellectual History at Newcastle University, as part of her British Academy Mid-Career Fellowship. The four speakers were John…

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Life in the Wilderness: Two years after the viva

In a previous blog post I wrote about my tips for surviving in academia as an early career researcher (ECR). Written some six months after my viva, I still stand by the majority of the statements I made in it. But time brings new perspective, so I wanted to share some more experiences that I’m finding common amongst early career researchers. Please let me know by commenting at the bottom of this blog post if…

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IMEMS Fellowship: Exploring the manuscripts of the English Poor Clares

In 2007 Durham University Library was gifted the lion’s share of the library of the English Poor Clares. Consisting of 796 printed works and 74 manuscripts, the extensive collection contains what remains of the libraries of the four major English Poor Clare convents of the early seventeenth century: Gravelines, Dunkirk, Aire and Rouen. After returning to England during the French Revolution, the nuns settled at Haggerston Castle in Northumberland, then Scorton Hall in Yorkshire, and…

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