Conference Report: Early Modern Political Thought and Twenty-First Century Politics, 16th May 2018

Recently I was fortunate enough to attend an evening workshop at the Lit & Phil Library, Newcastle. The goal of the session was to explore what early-modern thinkers had to say on the themes of popular mobilisation, toleration, environmentalism and exile and what their insights might add to contemporary political discussions. The workshop was organised by Dr Rachel Hammersley, Senior Lecturer in Intellectual History at Newcastle University, as part of her British Academy Mid-Career Fellowship. The four speakers were John…

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Book Review: Jane Lead and her Transnational Legacy

Jane Lead and the Philadelphian Society are not particularly well known figures to most scholars of late 17th- and early 18th-century religion. Born in 1624, Lead experienced a spiritual awakening aged 16. On Christmas Day 1640, while her family danced and celebrated, she was overwhelmed with a ‘beam of Godly light’ and a gentle inner voice offering spiritual guidance. After the death of her husband in 1670 she received daily spiritual outpourings, finding comfort in…

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Conference Report: Early Modern Catholics in the British Isles and Europe, 1-3 July 2015

At the start of July I attended the international and interdisciplinary conference ‘Early Modern Catholics in the British Isles and Europe: Integration or Separation?’ at Ushaw College, Durham. The conference was funded by the Centre for Catholic Studies, Durham University; Univesity of Notre Dame; University of Bergen; the European Network on the Instruments of Devotion; St Cuthbert’s Society, Ushaw; and the Catholic Record Society. The conference was directed by James Kelly and very well administrated…

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